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7 Adar Dinner - Cincinatti - Bringing the Jewish People Together
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
In this speech given at a Zayin Adar Seudah to the Chevra Kadisha members, we discuss different aspects of chessed involved with the story of Purim. We are one nation, and our self-interest and communal interest cannot be separated, as seen with Esther's dedication to her people when she went to the king uninvited. Esther also personifies another aspect of chessed- the opportunity to be G-d's hand and extend goodness to others. On Purim, we act with chessed when we focus on the mitzvos of the day, enabling us to extensions of Hashem's hands, focused on the good of the community.
A Thought for Rosh Hashana & Yom Kippur: Judged by Our Maker
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
When Hashem judges us on Rosh Hashana, He is not simply passing strict judgement on us. Because He is our creator, He is invested in us and does not want to destroy us. The King of Ninveh taught this lesson to his people by making them remove stolen beams from their houses, so that they should understand the pain of harming something that you have invested in. May we be worthy of Hashem’s investing in us, and work to make our actions proper, in line with Hashem wants from us.
Bais Yaakov - Special Shiur on Rosh Hashana and Teshuvah: Mission Statement
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Although Rosh Hashana is the first of the Aseres Yemei Teshuva, we don't ask for forgiveness in the tefillos of the day. We don't either focus on the aspect of judgement-rather, we focus on recognizing Hashem as the ruler of the entire universe, with the prayer that the entire world will understand this. Before Rosh Hashana, it is important for us to define our mission statement and make sure that what we do matches up with those goals. When we align our mission to Hashem's mission for the world, we can ask for another year of life, and ask forgiveness for the sins that we did which do not match up with our real mission and purpose.
Chanukah - Building for the Future
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
On Chanukah, we celebrate with parties, although there is no mitzvah obligation to do so. The source for the feasts comes from the celebration of the completion of building the mishkan. Although the mishkan was finished on Chanukah, it did not come into use until Nissan. Chanukah comes at the darkest point in the year, and the only way to recognize the nes (miracle) is if one watches it for all eight days. Our survival in golus (exile) is a miracle like this, too, and we wait for the day when we will have a complete revelation of Hashem's presence, just like at the inauguration of the mishkan.
Chanukah - Unconditional Dedication and Mesiras Nefesh
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Every Jew has the ability to give up his life for Hashem because of Avraham's willingness to sacrifice himself in Nimrod's fiery furnace. The Chashmonaim exhibited this heroism in dark times, showing us that Hashem is with us even if you don't see results. However, in the end, they became distracted because of the good that Hashem showered on them, and were lost. We need to find Hashem and see Hashem even without a demonstration, and need to make sure that we are serving Him without only focusing on the bracha that we get.
Chanukah and the Definition of Life
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
On Chanukah, we celebrate and appreciate our definition of life-a life of connection to Hashem and spirituality, and that which the Yevonim (Greeks) wanted to destroy. We celebrate that our spiritual lives were saved by engaging in praising Hashem, and coming closer to Him through His Torah and mitzvos.
Chanukah Shiur - To See the Light
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
The lights of the menorah are not for illumination, as we are forbidden from using their light. The light that we value is not measured in terms of output, but rather are valuable just as pure goodness. The wisdom of the Greeks was only measured in terms of output. The light of our wisdom is about seeing the growth of a person, not only about outcome.
Enhancing Your Rosh Hashana Experience
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Every year, we go through the same holidays during the Yamim Noraim season. In this shiur, we discuss four great values that we get out of this yearly experience, and explain how they apply to our human relationships as well. The geshmak that we get out of the closeness, in addition to the degree of connection and relationship that are celebrated, are two important aspects. Additionally, the fact that we annually receive forgiveness is very reassuring. This season reaffirms our true values, and helps us get back on track in order to focus on what we are really living for.
Hagaddah - A Story of Empathy and Compassion
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Hagaddah - As If You Left Mitzrayim
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Hagaddah - The Basis of our Faith
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah as Testimony
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5776 Part I - Sefer HaBris
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5776 Part II - The Sacred Bris
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5776 Part III - Renewing the Bris
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5776 Part IV - Yosef at the Seder Part I- Moshe Took the Bones of Yosef - Two Phases of Galus and Geulah
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5776 Part V - Yosef at the Seder Part II- Two Redemptions
by Rabbi Moshe Hauer
Haggadah Series 5776 Part VI - Yosef at the Seder Part III- Smart Miracles
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5776 Part VII - Yosef at the Seder Part IV - Bread and Wine
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5777 - Part I - G-d's Promise
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5777 - Part II - Lavan in the Haggadah I
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Series 5777 - Part III - Lavan's Loving Threat
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Workshop Part I: Questions & Answers:Lessons for Seder Night
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Haggadah Workshop Part II: The Essence of the Story-Two Perspectives
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Hoshana Rabba - The Sin of The Eitz HaDaas
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Improving Our Davening - Introducing a Framework
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Jews & Gentiles on Rosh Hashana
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Although Rosh Hashana is a day of judgement for the entire world, we are the only ones who commemorate it in a celebratory fashion. On this day, we focus on the ideas of malchiyos, and Kiddush Hashem, asking Hashem to make His name known throughout the entire world. Yom Kippur is the greatest expression of our closeness to Hashem as His chosen nation, as it is the day that Hashem assured Moshe that He would never trade us in for a different nation.
Parshas Tetzaveh & Purim- Ring Before Entering
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Parshas Tzav - Korban Todah & Pesach
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Pesach & Eliyahu Hanavi, Parents & Children
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Eliyahu Hanavi is identified as coming to a bris, and coming to the seder. In the last nevuah (prophecy), it says that Eliyahu will come and return the hearts of fathers through their children, and children through their fathers. This power of Eliyahu, preserving the future through being zealous for Hashem, is evident in both of these occasions. A child represents the future, and we try to pass on our legacy and impart our mesorah to our children. This obligates us to become better, working to be examples for our children and to answer their questions. On the night of Pesach, we give to our children, enabling them to move forward and become our future.
Pesach - Eliyahu HaNavi and Moshe Rabbenu
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Pesach - Eliyahu Hanavi's Cup and Chair
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Pesach - Moshe's Miracles
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
The nissim(miracles) that Moshe performed are qualitatively different from any other navi (prophet). Moshe did miracles in front of the entire nation, unlike other neviim, who performed miracles for small groups of people, or in homes of individuals. Additionally, Moshe acted as a direct emissary of Hashem, performing exactly what Hashem wanted, not as an agent who fulfills Hashem's will without the specific knowledge or ability to differentiate between exactly who deserves consequences and who does not. On the night of Pesach, we aim to follow this approach of Moshe—tailoring the telling of Yetzias Mitzrayim to each individual child, as opposed to taking a ‘wholesale approach’.
Pesach Q & A
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Pesach Rediscovered - Part I - Celebrating the Power of Speech
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
The power of speech and the power of free choice are two abilities that are unique to humans. In Mitzrayim, we suffered from a failure to use the power of speech properly. On the night of Pesach, we use our power of speech and free choice in the proper way, choosing to speak about miracles. Yetzias Mitzrayim is part of a broader picture, bringing us back to the way Adam was before the chet (sin). When we tell the story over to our children, we use the power of speech to affirm what man is supposed to be when we came out of Mitzrayim.
Pesach Rediscovered - Part II - From Dependence to Partnership
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
We sing the song of dayeinu, thanking Hashem for all of the continuous chessed He bestows upon us. Through Yetzias Mitzrayim, we transition from being the recipients of pure chessed, to the recipients of Hashem's kindness along with expectations that come with Matan Torah. We are fortunate to be entering this realm of chessed combined with din (justice), as our relationship becomes a deeper partnership, rather than mere dependence.
Pesach Rediscovered - Part III - Renewed Responsibility
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
On Pesach, we are mekabel ol malchus Shamayim--we accept the yoke of Hashem as king upon ourselves. We have left Mitzrayim, and are no longer under the jurisdiction of a kingdom who wishes to prevent us from serving Hashem. Our acceptance of Hashem as king is not a once in a year obligation--rather, we fulfill it every day when we recite krias shema. Every day, we renew our commitment, just as every day, Hashem renews the world. This koach (power) of hischadshus (renewal) is the power of the yetzer tov, and gives the strength and vitality to renew our commitment to Hashem, especially accessed on the night of the Seder.
Pre-Yom Kippur Shiur - Pity or Cherish
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Every day in davening we say the word "chus" in Shema Koleinu, asking Hashem to have pity on us. However, the word chus may have a different meaning, as seen in the story with Yonah and the kikayon (gourd) that was destroyed. Hashem chastises Yonah because he had "chus" on the kikayon-because he cherished it and desired it. When we daven to Hashem, we ask Him for "chus" that He should cherish us and do for us out of His love and desire for us, not merely pity.
Pre-Yom Kippur Shiur - Teshuva- What Do You Want?
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
When we do teshuva, we are expressing our desire to re-commit to Hashem, choosing actions that will enable us to lead a life according to the Torah. Expressing charatah (regret) is making the choice to redefine life according to what Hashem wants, and the desire alone is already considered as an action. Therefore, someone who does teshuva out of love will have his aveiros changes to mitzvos, as his returning expresses a tremendous ratzon (desire) to connect to Hashem.
Purim - Fury and Coolness
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Purim - Inspiring Our Family Life
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Purim - Vashti's Tail
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
One of the most famous midrashim on Purim discusses the tail that Vashti grew after she was summoned to Achashveirosh. There are animalistic elements of Vashti that are expressed through the growth of a tail, similar to her grandfather Nevuchadnezzar. Nevuchadnezzar was reduced to an animal-like creature when he became too haughty and forgot that Hashem is above the entire world. The snake convinced Chava to eat from the Etz Hadaas with this same idea: the possibility to be on the same level as Hashem, rather than below Him. However, the picture of a true tzelem elokim, someone is the image of G-d who is above animals, is someone who recognizes that Hashem is above him.
Purim and Unity
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
One of the 4 mitzvos of Purim is Mishloach Manos, giving gifts to our friends, which creates a closeness and bond between people. One of the fundamental understandings of bein adam l'chavero (actions between man and his friend) is that we all need in each other in order to survive and thrive. We need each other in every aspect, and must act as our brother's keeper. This can be the case even with Yaakov and Esav-the challenges and difficulties are necessary in order for us to reach our shleimus (perfection).
Purim is Not a Yom Tov
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Purim Shiur - Getting Married on Purim
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Rediscovering Purim Part 1: Renewed Commitment
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Purim is a time when we reaccepted the Torah, reaffirming our connection to Hashem. In this shiur based on the teachings of Rav Hutner, we explore three explanations of Kimu V'kiblu (they established and reaccepted [the Torah]). First, although Amalek wants to claim that our relationship with Hashem is a chance encounter, we prove that it is an ongoing relationship that we will stick to and preserve. Additionally, we are stating that we were not forced, but rather, we are the same Klal Yisroel that said Na'aseh V'nishmah (we will do and we will hear) at Har Sinai, and we want to accept the Torah. This positive acceptance does not necessitate any separation from the past or charatah (regret); rather, the strength of the good takes away from the strength of the bad through the v'nahapoch hu of Purim.
Rediscovering Purim Part 2: Yaakov & Eisav- The Purim Story
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Purim is a continuation of the conflict between Yaakov and Esav, as expressed through Esav's descendant, Amalek. Although Yaakov and Esav are twins and share similar external similarities, they are fundamentally different internally. In this shiur based on the teachings of Rav Hutner, we explore two different dimensions of the relationship between Yaakov and Esav. While Esav's realm is Olam Hazeh and gashmiyus (materialism), Yaakov's portion is Olam Habah (the World to Come), and focused on ruchniyus (spirituality). Esav is powerful today, and appears as though he is winning in this world, but ultimately, Yaakov has the power of tomorrow, and will win over Esav. Purim is a time when we experienced that element of machar (tomorrow), winning over Amalek, as Yaakov triumphing over Esav.
Rediscovering Succos - Based on Rav Hutner - Mission Accomplished
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Remembering Yetzias Mitzrayim: Privilege & Obligation
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Rosh Chodesh Adar- PTG: Using Challenges for Growth
by Hauer, Rabbi Moshe
Pesach is the Yom Tov of distinction between the Jews and their oppressors, while Purim is characterized by a blurring of distinctions. In the month of Adar, it is not so clear which events are terrible, and which are great. This difference is characterized in the dissimilar outcomes when Sarah and Esther were taken to the house of kings- while Sarah left untouched, Esther remained in the palace for the rest of her life. Although everything that led up to the Purim story did not seem to be great events for a miracle to occur, in the end, the entire situation completely turned around. This is the avodah (work) of the month of Adar-to use difficult situations to grow, and try to find the simcha even in difficult circumstances, like those of the Purim story.