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Monday, Oct 21, 2019 Parshas Bereshis 22 Tishrei, 5780
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Series: Hard to Swallow: Our Relationship with Food
The statistics tell it all: More than two-thirds of U.S. adults are overweight, and more than a third are obese. Let's face it, America is a food-obsessed nation. Despite the warnings by doctors and government bodies, attempts to limit sugar-laden soft drinks, the efforts by the First Lady to encourage healthier eating and increased exercise, overconsumption of food continues to be a major problem - one that will not go away anytime soon. As Jews, we know that food is an integral part of our religion. With three meals every Shabbos, holidays that encourage - nay, require - preparation of elaborate meals, and circumcisions, bar/bat mitzvahs and weddings galore, watching what we eat seems doubly difficult, and fasting on Yom Kippur is unlikely to make much of a dent. Yet the Torah mandates that we guard our health, and our halachic sources are replete with discussions of abstaining from excessive eating. So what's the bottom line? Are we to eat, drink and be merry, or should we stay away from second helpings? Is vegetarianism encouraged by the Torah? Is one required to go on a healthy-eating plan? Presenters: Dr. David Shapiro, Chiropractor for the Colorado Ballet, Chiropractor for Denver Outlaws Lacrosse, Health and Wellness Coach and Lecturer Rabbi Mordechai Fleisher, Director of Operations, Denver Community Kollel
Level: N/A | Age: All Ages | Gender: both

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Hard to Swallow: Our Relationship with Food Shapiro, [Dr.] David; Fleisher, [Rabbi] Mordechai

 

 


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